one can go on and on about this topic

15 Aug

“It gave me a sense of identity,” she says. “I really liked the purpose behind the hijab — a woman covering herself so that a man should know her for her mind, not her body.”

Very interesting point about veiling …

The hijab, however, actually predates Islam, Shirazi explains. The first known reference to veiling (Shirazi uses the term hijab and veil interchangeably) was made in an Assyrian legal text in the 13th century B.C., Shirazi says. In the Assyrian, and later, the Roman and Byzantine empires, the veil was a symbol of prestige and status, she says. By the 12th century, the veil had been imposed on women in the Muslim world to exclude them from public life, Shirazi says.

People are still debating the meaning of the hijab today.

In 2007, British Muslim groups protested when schools were given the right to ban students from wearing full-face veils. In 2008, Turkey’s top court upheld a ban on wearing Muslim headscarves at the country’s universities. That same year, a Muslim woman was briefly jailed at a suburban Atlanta, Georgia, courthouse after refusing to remove her hijab in court.

Woes of a budding hijabi…

Hekmati was more concerned as a teenager about more personal issues, like her relations with boys. The hijab made it more difficult, she says. Few asked her on dates. Guys always seemed to put her in the “friend category.” She wondered if she was attractive.

“I wondered at times: Am I always going to be a guy’s friend and nothing more.”

“One guy asked me if I was allergic to the sun,” Hekmati says.

Abdelaziz, the New Jersey high school senior, also had her tense public encounters: angry looks, people feeling sorry for her or assuming her father ordered her to wear the hijab.

“It’s not oppression; it’s not that I’m accepting degradation — it’s about self-respect,” she says.

But it’s more about faith as well. She says the hijab affirms “Islam in the most respectful and purified way.”

“When you actually wear it, it opens your eyes,” she says. “It makes you want to explore your religious faith.”

At times, Abdelaziz says she wonders what it would be like to attend her prom, get a tan at the beach and have a boyfriend.

But she says her decision to honor her faith is already paying off.

“It really feels good,” she says. “It felt like I was missing something and now I’m complete. I finally understand my purpose.”

It makes me feel thankful? My battle wasnt that hard…

Read more…

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